How to be a pirate, behavior and speech

Discussion in 'Braavosian Sealords [XXX]' started by Dragkhar, Jan 31, 2014.

  1. Dragkhar

    Dragkhar Active Member

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    Pirates are rude, they drink and they love to brag.
    They also speak funny and dislikes most men, landlubbers, that does not live like pirates.

    A true pirate know how to appreciate the quiet life with a lot of drinking, robbery, fighting, gambling, laying wenches and just being them self.

    If you want to be a pirate in the Braavosian Sealords we demand nothing else but this of you, role play a rude but loyal pirate that dislikes other humans and love the simple pirate life.
    We also demand a small interaction effort from you as you log in your pirate, to make our town a little more alive.

    We want You to always after you logged in your pirate seek up the nearest inn, brothel or pub, drink a few bottles of beer, wine or stronger spirits, play some cards or dice and brag about how good you and/or we are.
    You don't have to talk to anyone if no one is around a monologue is as good as anything, after all, a pirate know that the best answers always comes from himself.
    Our pirate chars should always aim to log out and in at the Pirate Bay Inn on Bald island and remember to as much as possible role play your pirate. This means that in most cases you need a boat to get to and from our small settlement.
    This is not in anyway a strict rule that will be punished if not followed but rather a recommendation since it will make the pirate role more genuine and true, not only for us but also for all other players on this shard.

    The pirates have and always had their own way of speaking, not really different from the speech of the landlubbers but some words have a twist and some are totally specific for pirates.
    Below is a dictionary of useful and funny words you may learn and use while interacting in the world.
    We will never force you to learn all of them but the more words you pick up the more fun we can have with the common people.

    Phrases

    Ahoy
    An interjection used to hail a ship or a person, or to attract attention.
    Arr!
    An exclamation.
    Avast!
    A command meaning stop or desist.
    Aye (or ay)
    Yes; an affirmation.
    Becalmed
    The state of a sailing vessel which cannot move due to a lack of wind.
    Belay
    (1) To secure or make fast (a rope, for example) by winding on a cleat or pin.
    (2) To stop, most often used as a command.
    Black spot
    A black smudge on a piece of paper used by pirates as a threat. A black spot is often accompanied by a written message specifying the threat. Most often a black spot represents a death threat.
    Blimey!
    An exclamation of surprise.
    Blow the man down
    To kill someone.
    Careen
    To take a ship into shallower waters or out of the water altogether and remove barnacles and pests such as mollusks, shells and plant growth from the bottom. Often a pirate needs to careen his ship to restore it to proper speed. Careening can be dangerous to pirates as it leaves the ship inoperable while the work is being done.
    We use this when we manage to board a ship, kill it’s crew and get a hold of the ship key so we can dock the ship
    Chase
    A ship being pursued.
    Crack Jenny’s tea cup
    To spend the night in a house of ill repute.
    Dance the hempen jig
    To hang.
    Davy Jones’ Locker
    A fictional place at the bottom of the ocean. In short, a term meaning death. Davy Jones was said to sink every ship he ever over took, and thus, the watery grave that awaited all who were sunk by him was given his name. To die at sea is to go to Davy Jones' Locker.
    Deadlights
    Eyes.
    Dead men tell no tales
    Standard pirate excuse for leaving no survivors.
    Fire in the hole
    A warning issued before a cannon is fired.
    Furl
    To roll up and secure, especially a ship’s sail.
    Give no quarter
    The refusal to spare lives of an opponent. Pirates raise a red flag to threaten no quarter will be given.
    To go on account
    A pleasant term used by pirates to describe the act of turning pirate. For us turning red
    Grog blossom
    A redness on the nose or face of persons who drink ardent spirits to excess.
    Hang the jib
    To pout or frown.
    Haul wind
    To direct a ship into the wind.
    Ho
    Used to express surprise or joy, to attract attention to something sighted, or to urge onward.
    Hornswaggle
    To cheat.
    Keelhaul
    To punish someone by dragging them under a ship, across the keel, until near-death or death. Both pirates and the Royal Navy were fond of this practice.
    Letter of marquee
    “A document given to a sailor (privateer) giving him amnesty from piracy laws as long as the ships plunders are of an enemy nation. “
    We will give everyone this letter (in game it will be a book) who we feel should have amnesty.
    Could be a trader we have a use of, a fisherman or a treasure hunter who paid us a bounty or an “outsider” who we have a use of.
    Loaded
    To be drunk.
    Maroon
    To abandon a person on a deserted coast or island with little in the way of supplies. It is a fairly common punishment for violation of a pirate ship's articles, or offending her crew because the victims death cannot be directly connected to his former brethren.
    Marooned
    To be stranded, particularly on a desert isle.
    Me
    My.
    Motherload
    The largest amount of booty discovered.
    No prey, no pay
    A common pirate law meaning a crew received no wages, but rather shared whatever loot was taken.
    Overhaul
    To gain upon in a chase; to overtake.
    Parley (sometimes incorrectly “parlay”)
    A conference or discussion between opposing sides during a dispute.
    We don’t do parleys
    Pillage
    To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war; plunder.
    Piracy
    Robbery committed at sea.
    Plunder
    To take booty; rob.
    Reef sails
    To shorten the sails by partially tying them up, either to slow the ship or to keep a strong wind from putting too much strain on the masts.
    Sail ho!
    An exclamation meaning another ship is in view. The sail, of course, is the first part of a ship visible over the horizon.
    Scupper that!
    An expression of anger or derision meaning "Throw that overboard!"
    Sea legs
    The ability to adjust one's balance to the motion of a ship, especially in rough seas. After walking on a ship for long periods of time, sailors became accustomed to the rocking of the ship in the water. Early in a voyage a sailor was said to be lacking his "sea legs" when the ship motion was still foreign to him. After a cruise, a sailor would often have trouble regaining his "land legs" and would swagger on land.
    Shiver me timbers!
    An expression of surprise or strong emotion.
    Show a leg!
    A phrase used to wake up a sleeping pirate.
    Sink me!
    An expression of surprise.
    splice the main brace
    To have a drink or perhaps several drinks.
    Squiffy
    Somewhat intoxicated; tipsy.
    Swab
    (1) To clean, specifically the deck of a ship. (2) A disrespectful term for a seaman. ie: "Man that gun, ye cowardly swabs!"
    Swing the lead
    The lead was a weight at the bottom of a line that gave sailors a way to measure depth when near land. To Swing the Lead was considered a simple job, and thus came to represent one who is avoiding work or taking the easy work over the hard. In today's terms, one who swings the lead is a slacker.
    Take a caulk
    To take a nap
    Walk the plank
    Perhaps more famous than historically practiced, walking the plank is the act of being forced off a ship by pirates as punishment or torture. The victim, usually blindfolded or with bound hands or both, is forced to walk along a plank laid over the ship's side and fall into the water below. The concept first appeared in nineteenth century fiction, long after the great days of piracy. History suggests that this might have happened once that can be vaguely documented, but it is etched in the image of the pirates for its dastardly content.
    Weigh anchor
    To haul the anchor up; more generally, to leave port.
    Ye
    You.

    Namecalling

    Bilge rat
    An insulting name given by a pirate.
    Boatswain
    A warrant officer or petty officer on a merchant ship who is in charge of the ships rigging, anchors, cables, and deck crew.
    Bravos
    A class in Braavosian Sealords
    This title has everyone that has fencing as primary fighting skill.
    Bravos can use any other skills he wants but GM poisoning would be appreciated as well as hiding for surprise attacks or to quickly hide from our foes.
    Tactics and anatomy is off course a must for maximum damage and hit ratio.
    Magery is allowed as skill but not allowed in combat or any other RP situations other than when a gate is needed to transport fellow Braavosian.
    For cure and heal the Bravos use potions and bandaids.
    Buccaneer
    A class in Braavosian Sealords
    This title has everyone that has sword as primary fighting skill.Buccaneers can use any other skills he wants but GM poisoning would be appreciated as well as hiding for surprise attacks or to quickly hide from our foes.
    Tactics and anatomy is off course a must for maximum damage and hit ratio.
    Magery is allowed as skill but not allowed in combat or any other RP situations other than when a gate is needed to transport fellow Braavosian.
    For cure and heal the Buccaneers use potions and bandaids.
    Bucko
    A familiar term meaning friend.
    Carouser
    One who drinks wassail and engages in festivity, especially riotous drinking.
    Chandler
    A class in Braavosian Sealords.
    This title is given to all our crafters.Braavosians are known as good crafters in all skills and except for the loot our foe gives us the Chandlers provide our equipment.
    If you plan to make a crafter, consider making Black smith, Alchemist, Bowyer or Fletcher first.
    Alchemists are always needed to produce explosion, heal, cure and poison potions
    Coxswain
    A person who usually steers a ship's boat and has charge of its crew.
    Hands
    The crew of a ship; sailors.
    Hearties
    A term of familiar address and fellowship among sailors.
    Interloper
    One that trespasses on a trade monopoly, as by conducting unauthorized trade in an area designated to a chartered company; a ship used in unauthorized trade.
    Everyone that has not been given the Letter of marquee.
    Knave
    A class in Braavosian Sealords.
    This title is given to all new crafter recruits.
    Once a new member has proven his worth he will get upgraded to Chandler
    (A servant boy or a dishonorable man.)
    Lad
    A way to address a younger male.
    Landlubber (or lubber)
    A person unfamiliar with the sea or seamanship. The term doesn't derive from "land lover," but rather from the root of lubber, meaning clumsy or uncoordinated. Thus, a landlubber is one who is awkward at sea for familiarity with the land. The term is used to insult the abilities of one at sea.
    Lass
    A way to address a younger female.
    Lookout
    A person posted to keep watch on the horizon for other ships or signs of land.
    Matey
    A piratical way to address someone in a cheerful, if not necessarily friendly, fashion.
    Musketeer
    A class in Braavosian Sealords.
    This title has eveyone who has magery (musket) as primary fighting skill.
    This is most likely the most demanding pirate role to play and takes a big load of discipline to not “abuse” his magery powers.
    Musketeers may ONLY use circle 6 explosion in combination with a “dress fishing rod macro”, and an additional “say something bad ass” in the macro is appreciated as well as hiding for surprise attacks or to quickly hide from our foes.
    The idea is to simulate a musket being fired, since explosion has a delay time a fishing rod can be equipped before it hits the enemy. Attack stance is also needed for this.
    Along with magery the Musketeers should also use evaluate intelligence for most damage.
    Other than this magery is not allowed in combat or any other RP situations other then when a gate is needed to transport fellow Braavosian.
    For cure and heal the Musketeer use potions and bandaids.
    Navigator
    A class in Braavosian Sealords.
    This title has everyone who has archery as primary fighting skill.
    A Navigator can use any other skills he wants but GM tracking would be appreciated as well as hiding for surprise attacks or to quickly hide from our foes.
    Magery is allowed as skill but not allowed in combat or any other RP situations other than when a gate is needed to transport fellow Braavosian.
    For cure and heal the Navigator use potions and bandaids.
    Picaroon
    A scoundrel.
    Pirate
    One who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without commission from a sovereign nation; the opposite of a privateer.
    Quartermaster
    A class in Braavosian Sealords.
    This title has everyone who has magery as primary fighting skill.
    A Quartermaster can use any other skills he wants but a “stun mage” or “heal mage” template would be preferable.
    Quartermasters will also primary be responsible for gating fellow pirates if need be.
    A “heal mage” Quartermaster can do a lot of good in combat not only adding good DPS but also take part in cross healing fellow pirates.
    Another skill that might be useful is hiding, for surprise attacks or to quickly hide from our foes.
    Sailor
    A class in Braavosian Sealords.
    This title is given to all new recruits and our fishermen or non trading members that not interact in battle and are not a crafter.
    Once a new member has proven his worth he will get upgraded to his suitable class depending on above criteria.
    Sealord
    The title of the guildmaster of [XXX] Braavosian Sealords
    Scallywag
    A villainous or mischievous person.
    Scourge of the seven seas
    A pirate known for his extremely violent and brutal nature.
    Strumpet
    A promiscuous woman; a female prostitute.
    Sutler
    A merchant in port, selling the various things that a ship needs for supplies and repairs.
    Wench
    A young woman or peasant girl, sometimes a prostitute.
    Rapscallion
    A mischievous person; a scoundrel.

    Merriment

    Black jack
    A drink container made of leather.
    Bumboo (or bumbo)
    A popular pirate drink made from rum, water, sugar and nutmeg or cinnamon.
    Bung hole
    A dispensing hole in a wooden barrel typically sealed with a cork
    Cackle fruit
    Hen’s eggs.
    Clap of thunder
    A strong, alcoholic drink.
    Grog (see also spirits)
    An alcoholic liquor, especially rum diluted with water. Admiral Vernon is said to have been the first to dilute the rum of sailors (about 1745.)
    Hardtack (also sea biscuit)
    A hard biscuit or bread made from flour and water baked into a moisture-free rock to prevent spoilage; a pirate ships staple. Hardtack has to be broken into small pieces or soaked in water before eaten.
    Hogshead
    (1) A large cask used mainly for the shipment of wines and spirits. (2) A unit of measurement equal to approximately one hundred gallons.
    Nelson’s folly
    Rum.
    Nipperkin
    A small cup or drink.
    Rum
    An intoxicating beverage, specifically an alcoholic liquor distilled from fermented molasses or sugar cane.
    Salmagundi
    A salad usually consisting of chopped meat, anchovies, eggs, and onions, often arranged in rows on lettuce and served with vinegar and oil.
    Spirits
    An alcoholic beverage, especially distilled liquor.
    Tankard
    A cylindrical, single-handled drinking mug, usually made of pewter

    Financials

    Booty
    Treasure.
    Bounty
    Reward or payment, usually from a government, for the capture of a criminal, specifically a pirate.
    Coffer
    A chest in which treasure is usually kept.
    Doubloon
    Gold coin
    Loot
    Stolen goods; money.

    Weponry

    Belaying pin
    A short wooden rod to which a ship's rigging is secured. A common improvised weapon aboard a sailing ship, because they're everywhere, they're easily picked up, and they are the right size and weight to be used as clubs.
    Buckle
    A small, often rounded shield held in one’s fist to protect against an opponent’s sword. The buckle could also be used to strike a blow to an opponent’s face.
    Cat o’ nine tails (or cat)
    A whip with nine lashes used for flogging. "A taste of the cat" might refer to a full flogging.
    Chain shot
    Two cannonballs chained together and aimed high in order to destroy masts and rigging.
    This term is used by us for syncing explosion pot throwing.
    Cutlass
    A short, heavy sword with a curved blade used by pirates and sailors. The sword has only one cutting edge and may or may not have a useful point.
    Gabion
    A cylindrical wicker basket filled with earth and stones, used in building fortifications.
    Grapple(also grappling hook, grappling iron, or grapnel)
    An iron shaft with claws at one end, usually thrown by a rope and used for grasping and holding, especially one for drawing and holding an enemy ship alongside.
    Gun (musket)
    A cannon.
    This term can be used by us in the meaning of musket
    Powder chest
    An exploding wooden box filled with scrap metals and gun powder, usually secured to the side of a ship to thwart a boarding enemy.
    Trapped box made by tinkers
    Six pounders
    Cannons.

    Measurement

    Draft
    The depth of a vessel's keel below the water line, especially when loaded; the minimum water depth necessary to float a ship.
    Draught (also draft)
    (1)The amount taken in by a single act of drinking. (2) The drawing of a liquid, as from a cask or keg.
    Fathom
    A unit of length equal to six feet, used principally in the measurement and specification of marine depths.
    Freeboard
    A measurement on the side of a ship between the deck the waterline.
    League
    A unit of distance equal to three miles.

    Orientation

    Aft (or abaft)
    At, in, toward, or close to the rear of the ship
    Amidship (or amidships)
    The middle of a ship.
    Broadside
    A general term for the vantage on another ship of absolute perpendicular to the direction it is going. To get along broadside a ship was to take it at a very vulnerable angle. This is of course, the largest dimension of a ship and is easiest to attack with larger arms. A "Broadside" has come to indicate a hit with a cannon or similar attack right in the main part of the ship.
    Heel (also list)
    When a ship leans to one side or the measurement of it’s tilt.
    Lee
    The side away from the direction from which the wind blows.
    List
    To lean or cause to lean to the side.
    Port
    (1) A seaport. (2) The left side of the ship when you are facing toward her prow.
    Starboard
    The right side of the ship when you are facing toward her prow.

    Ship and sailing lingo

    Ballast
    Heavy material that is placed in the hold of a ship to enhance stability
    Barkadeer
    A small pier or jetty vessel.
    Barque (also bark)
    A sailing ship with from three to five masts, all of them square-rigged except the after mast, which is fore-and-aft rigged; a small vessel that is propelled by oars or sails.
    Beam (also arm)
    A piece of timber perpendicular to the sides of a ship which supports the deck. Also used to identify objects in relation to objects perpendicular to the ship that are visible from the port or starboard side.
    Bilge
    (1) The lowest part inside the ship, within the hull itself which is the first place to show signs of leakage. The bilge is often dank and musty, and considered the most filthy, dead space of a ship. (2) Nonsense, or foolish talk.
    Bilge water
    Water inside the bilge sometimes referred to as bilge itself.
    Bittacle
    A box on the deck of a ship holding the ship’s compass.
    Bow
    The front of a ship.
    Brigantine (also brig)
    A two-masted sailing ship, square-rigged on both masts.
    Cable
    A heavy rope or chain for mooring or anchoring a ship.
    Clipper
    A fast moving ship.
    Cog
    A small warship.
    Futtock
    The curved strips of wood that make up the underside of a ship.
    Galleon
    A large three-masted sailing ship with a square rig and usually two or more decks, used from the 15th to the 17th century especially by Spain as a merchant ship or warship.
    Gally
    A low, flat vessel propelled partly, or wholly by oars.
    Gangplank
    A board or ramp used as a removable footway between a ship and a pier.
    Hold
    A large area for storing cargo in the lower part of a ship.
    Hull
    The body of a ship.
    Keel
    The underside of a ship which becomes covered in barnacles after sailing the seas.
    Lugger
    A two-masted sailing vessel with a lugsail rig.
    Mainmast
    The longest mast located in the middle of a ship.
    Prow (see also bow)
    The forwardmost area of the ship.
    Spyglass
    A telescope.
    Stern
    The rear part of a ship.

    //Rand
  2. Dragkhar

    Dragkhar Active Member

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